MP28 Part two

Custom builds, MP28, Sub Machine-guns, WWI, WWII

At the end of Part One, I had the two main external components at hand:_DSF5389_DSF5397

The receiver tube and the stock have been roughly cut, so most of the work to do was internal. I designed a custom hop unit to fit inside the receiver and feed the BBs back from the magwell to the chamber.

_DSF5520 _DSF5521

I sent off the orthographic drawings to a guy who can do 3D CAD work and he converted my designs into a digital model before 3D printing it in ABS. It looks smashing, far better than I ever expected!

_DSF5522

A bit of filing was needed to fit the hop in the tube, combined with a light tap with a small hammer and it was seated in place. A piece of barrel sits in the space in the side to engage with the magazine.

_DSF5549

_DSF5550The outer barrel is a piece of tube sat in the centre of the cooling jacket. Welded at the front and back are two steel rings to suspend the tube and at the front is the perforated front cap.

_DSF5552

Another little tap with the mallet and bingo, it fits very nicely!

_DSF5557

The rear cap has a space to take the locking latch, which is sprung with a tension spring. There are two screws in the edge of this back cap to secure it in place, though I may put another in the top.

_DSF5574

This latch then locks into the locking unit on the stock.

_DSF5564The rear sight functions much like the original, it is basically a miniaturised version of the sight I put on the MG08/15 with a ramp providing elevation adjustment and the leaf moving left and right for windage.

_DSF5563

There comes a point where you have to just try and fit the gearbox! Inevitably somewhere in your designs something will come a-cropper, in this case I forgot to factor in the nozzle position being at the top, not the centre of the cylinder casing. As a result the stock would have to be about 10mm deeper to fit the gearbox. Given that I have already made the stock this isn’t a great option! I plan to get a custom cylinder head made so that the nozzle is in a more convenient place.

_DSF5575 Also to save space I have conducted a little modification to the gearbox externals. The motor cage in most V7 gearboxes is angled down slightly to fit in M14 models. This is great if you are building a rifle, not so much for this project!

_DSF5577 My first thought was to build a whole custom motor cage but this would be a huge job. Instead I modified the original cage so that it sits slightly angled up. The motor came into contact with the back of the spring casing before it could be secured so a little material had to be removed from there. As you can see from the photo above, the trigger and a part of the fire select has also been removed.

_DSF5449 _DSF5561

The stock also needed a bit of space cutting out to take the gearbox. The shape eventually had to be quite complicated to take the wire guides on the side.
If this post has inspired you to want a project of your own, email us at enquiries.vintageairsoft@gmail.com. You can get regular updates on Facebook as well as here.

Still to come! Trigger unit, gearbox mounting and the magazine housing.

Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank

Anti-Tank, Cold War, Custom builds, PIAT, Products, Weapons, WWII

A_PIAT_(Projectile_Infantry_Anti-Tank)_in_action_at_a_firing_range_in_Tunisia,_19_February_1943._NA756

At the beginning of the Second World War, every major nation had a tanks of some description. What very few nations had was an effective way for infantry to counter them. At the time, the only way to disable a tank was with a risky sprint and throwing of a satchel charge (unofficially) or use of an anti-tank rifle. However anti-tank rifle technology was a hangover from the Great War and was already pretty outdated by the quality of armour on most tanks and was only useful against light armour and soft-skinned targets.

After the Battle of France, the British Army studied reports of infantry/tank contacts and failed to find a single example of the Boys anti-tank rifle actually destroying a tank.

Boys_Mk_I_AT_Rifle

The Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank or PIAT was what Britain came up with. Designed by Major Jefferis of MD1, the toy box of the War Office, with a great deal of input from Major Blacker of Blacker bombard fame. The basic design was that of a Spigot mortar, adapted for use as a direct-fire system.

A Spigot mortar uses a combination of a hefty spring and a small explosive charge at the base of the projectile to operate the weapon. The warhead, instead of sitting inside a barrel as per a regular mortar, sits over a small diameter tube and is actuated by a bar hitting the priming cap. A diagram explains this far better than words do:

British_Piat_schem.jpg~original

In this diagram you can just make out the guide tube in the centre of the projectile support. The missile slots over this and the firing pin travels through it.

piatgordon2

The effectiveness of the PIAT in use is much debated. Some sources cite that ammunition was unreliable, others that accuracy was a major issue at any kind of range and many that recoil was truly horrendous (some users said that you deserved the Victoria Cross just for firing it!). However a study of Canadian Officers ranked the PIAT as the number one most “outstandingly effective” weapon, above even the Bren, so in spite of its many foibles it was clearly well enough liked!

The PIAT was used by British and Empire forces throughout the war both as a direct fire anti-tank weapon and indirect fire support weapon. It was also given to the Soviet Union as part of lend-lease, dropped to partisans throughout Europe as well as by Israel post-war. It was last used officially by the Australians at the start of the Korean War, but it was quickly replaced.

The_British_Army_in_North-west_Europe_1944-45_B11928

As progress occurs we shall of course keep you posted on this build (follow the blog to help you keep track!), if this has inspired you to want a project of your own or you have any questions, do drop us a line! Our email is: enquiries.vintageairsoft@gmail.com. Also, ‘Like’ our Facebook page for updates and interesting articles.