Stopping Rifle: Build 3

Imperial Era, Sporting Arms, Stopping Rifle, Weapons, WWI

The forestock fitted in place is a little bit longer than the original but is fastened in the same way.

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This definitely improves the overall shape of the rifle.

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With the woodwork shaped and the buttplate fitted I applied a few layers of finish, leaving it to dry.

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In the metalwork department, I stripped the original paintwork from it. Underneath is aluminium of some kind, though some parts are an odd coppery colour.

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I applied Birchwood and Casey’s aluminium black. A couple of coats later and I have a nice dappled finish across the surface.

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The buttplate, being steel, is brushed smooth (though with a swirling pattern of sorts left on for some semblance of grip) and heated to a dull red before being quenched in oil. This leaves a rather pleasing mixed-colour finish varying from straw to light blue.

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The screws are blacked to fit in.

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The last bit is to mark up the rifle appropriately. On the bottom plate I’m marking the gun with my details and the ‘calibre’. Though it’s not technically .700 NE, the shells are actually very close.

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The first step is a quick going over of the script to give a shallow etch to follow. One can then lift the paper to check the etch is deep enough in a few places before removing the whole lot.

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With the paper removed, I add depth and boldness to the capitals and detailing in the few places I have the skill to add it.

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Once all the text is to depth, I used Birchwood Casey’s aluminium black as per the rest of the gun. In the picture below you can see where the back of the foregrip assembly had an argument with my planer, which was a sad event. That being said, I hope to make a replacement in the near future.

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I’m pretty pleased with how the script came out. This is only my second attempt at engraving work and I feel it is quite an improvement over the first. I’m not 100% happy with the calibre, but the script typeface isn’t too bad.

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This is basically finished now, so photographs of the complete item to follow!

 

If you are interested in this project you can see the rest of the project here. If you have an idea of your own, drop us a line on enquiries.vintageairsoft@gmail.com to discuss. ‘Like’ our Facebook page or follow the blog to get regular updates on projects and interesting videos and articles.

 

Don’t forget you can buy our smaller items via Etsy. Our larger items can be found here.

Stopping Rifle: Complete

Complete builds, Custom builds, Imperial Era, Products, Sporting Arms, Stopping Rifle, Weapons, WWI

At long last, the Stopping Rifle is done. So anyone planning on bringing an elephant or tiger to a site near me had better watch out!

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This break action is very satisfying to carry broken over the arm and practice your swift mountings in the bedroom mirror.

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The buttplate, lightly oil finished. I’m yet to take a picture that does this justice, but that gorgeous selection of colours fading from one to another is very satisfying.

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The straight-wrist stock is a classic English side-by-side design. I’ll probably make other styles of stock in future versions.

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The shells are roughly based on .700 Nitro-Express. These are quite nice for extraction and pocketing, a nice handful in every pair.

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The Express sights deserve comment. Given the nature of express cartridges, heavy and slow, they have a somewhat rainbow trajectory. This style of sight allows the shooter to quickly select their range and fire without having to finely adjust a wheel or tangent.

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At the front, I’ve taken a leaf out of the French book of rifle design, a chunky front post (already there) for fast shooting and a finer notch in the middle for more precise shots, just in case I ever want to make them!

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Broken open, the shells look pretty good! APS cartridges are the heart of this system, though I may make some custom shells in the future.

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Finally, the etching. I felt that this was the sort of detail that really needed doing. At some point, I’d like to come back to this and redo it with more extravagant etchings, some scrollwork or an elephant or something. Maybe when I’ve had a bit more practice…

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If you are interested in this project you can see the rest of the project here. If you have an idea of your own, drop us a line on enquiries.vintageairsoft@gmail.com to discuss. ‘Like’ our Facebook page or follow the blog to get regular updates on projects and interesting videos and articles.

 

Don’t forget you can buy our smaller items via Etsy. Our larger items can be found here.

First casting attempt

Tools, Weapons

OK, for those who have followed Vintage Airsoft for a VERY long time you will remember a couple of years back I built a kiln to try making some cast aluminium parts.

 

I have been trying to get my new version ready for use recently and have at last had my first casting session with it today. As many of you will know, I cast a lot of products from silicone moulds. I used one of these to make a wax copy of a 3D printed bolt. 

 

To this I added vents and a pouring spot. I made a bunch of these ready to do a batch of pours.

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These are contained within plaster moulds.

In these went into my mini oven for several hours. This has two purposes: 1. It melts the wax out of the plaster. 2. It dries out the plaster, forcing the moisture out of it. If there is any moisture left inside this can turn into steam instantaneously and crack the mould, possibly even a small explosion.

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As the last half hour came up I started melting the aluminium. 

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And then poured it into the moulds.

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And left it to cool…

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Once they cooled down, I broke them out of the moulds. 

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And the rest. These aren’t up to scratch for use but I am quite happy with them for a first attempt.

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In order to make more useful castings I think I will need to make more vents and pour the metal at a hotter temperature. I may experiment with some other casting materials and investments.