MG08/15 box magazine

Custom builds, Machine-Guns, MG08/15, Uncategorized, Weapons, WWI, WWII
As part of the MG08/15 build, my customer asked for a box magazine for use in fixed positions, as I am waiting to pick up the components of the gun itself from the laser cutters I though I may as well get started on this!
_DSF4969 _DSF4968
I started by getting an MG42 ammunition box from Ebay, although the MG08/15 used wooden ammunition crates in the Great War, in the context this gun is going to be used (WWII airsoft) this is perfectly correct. Many of these guns used in the second world war were adapted to take the chain belts of the MG34/42 instead of the cloth belts they were originally used with, so my next search was for some ammunition belt length and some inert rounds!
_DSF4970
Having found some belt and enough rounds for the snail drum magazine, I set to work building the magazine. I am using the internals of an M249 magazine to automatically feed the BBs into the feed tube. I am mounting this unit into a plywood box that will be able to be pushed down to switch the motor on and off. BBs can be poured in the top of the hop to top up once ammunition has run down.
_DSF4975
_DSF4977
The beauty of this unit is that there is still plenty of space in the ammunition can for spare BBs, tools or any miscellaneous bits that the user would find handy.
_DSF4979
This is of course not finished yet, more pictures to follow as progress is made! As ever, if this has given you an idea for you own project do let us know! You can email us at: enquiries.vintageairsoft@gmail.com.

MG08/15-initial designs

Custom builds, Machine-Guns, MG08/15, Weapons, WWI, WWII

For this project, I acquired a Classic Army M249 as I knew the gearbox was ideal for the build both dimensionally and for the heavy-duty fire-support role of the gun. Another advantage that cropped up was the incredibly easy to adjust hop, controlled by a wheel that was very easy to access. This will allow the user to adjust hop in the field without having to open up the gun, allowing for longer or closer range work.

DSCF4734

First job: to strip out the parts I need:

DSCF4735

Having drawn out the rough layouts on paper, it was quickly obvious that this apparently simple shape was actually going to be quite complicated to cut out. The sheer quantity of sheet steel required for this gun requires a different take to my usual old-fashioned ‘everything by hand’ approach, drawing out components on paper and modelling them in card was all very well but something would have to give for the manufacture of the gun itself.

_DSF4755

Taking the time to roughly model everything in card, I had my solution. CAD/CAM, or Computer Aided Design/Manufacture allows a designer to create an digital representation of an object and manufacture it on a suitable piece of machinery. Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) lathes, routers, milling machines, laser cutters and water jet cutters are but a few of the machines available. In this case I am investigating laser and water-jet cutting options.

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 19.46.28 Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 19.46.44 Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 19.47.41

Once I have all the components cut, parts can be riveted, bolted or welded together as appropriate. Some parts will still have to be made by hand, small details like the sighting system will be cut out and stamped by hand.

Having spent so much time designing on a computer, I can’t wait to get the parts cut and get to work making things properly!

For some background history on this project, see here.

 

As ever, if you are interested in our builds and want to know more or have a project in mind, do let us know! You can email us at enquiries.vintageairsoft@gmail.com.

The MG08/15

Custom builds, Machine-Guns, MG08/15, WWII

In the deadlock of trench warfare that epitomised the Western Front in Europe, all sides tried their hardest to develop a tactic or weapon that would allow them to break the stalemate.

The British developed the most successful weapon, the tank. This mobile fortress allowed men to push forward under solid cover which could also lay down suppressing fire. The Germans didn’t really catch on to the tank until later on (Blitzkrieg, anyone?) but they did appreciate the value of lightweight, well-equipped shock troops.

The trouble was that the weapons of the era were not well suited to this sort of combat: small units attacking well-defended, confined spaces. Rifles were too long, swords and bayonets unwieldy, handguns had a limited magazine capacity and range. What their Stormtroops needed was something to suppress enemy positions and quickly re-enforce their footholds.

The ideal would be to have a machine-gun that could be moved forward with the first wave of soldiers, but at the time even the lightest of machine-guns such as the British Lewis Gun was too heavy for long walks across no-man’s land. The Germans found their answer in the Maxim gun that they already used as their standard machine gun.

The Germans took the Maxim MG08 and effectively cut off everything they could. Gone was the empty space in the receiver, the water jacket was made smaller and most importantly, the spade grips and thumb trigger were taken off and replaced with a buttstock, the trigger being moved down to a pistol grip at the bottom of the receiver.

The result of this was a machine gun that could be advanced with the front line of troops, indeed it was supposed to be fired from the hip in a tactic known as ‘walking fire’ (the BAR was designed on similar grounds). This is the singularly worst tactic ever invented-I recommend you do not try this at home-if you are being shot at.

Walking fire.

The Germans also added a 100 round belt magazine that slid onto a carrier on the right side of the gun, though the gun could also be operated from the 250round boxes used for the standard MG08.

The shortage of machine-guns in the lead-up to WWII meant that the MG08/15 saw active service right up to 1945, meaning that it is a perfectly legitimate weapon for many WWII scenarios. In the coming weeks I will be posting regular updates on the progress of an Airsoft MG08/15 for a client in South Africa.